Formulating Effective Job Descriptions - Main Users / Purpose

files/images_static/user.jpg Government organisations, project managers, human resource managers, public sector officers.

Job descriptions are required for recruitment so that recruiter and the applicant can understand their roles. It defines a person’s role and accountability. Without a job description it is not possible for a person to properly commit to, or be held accountable for actions and results. Job descriptions improve an organization’s ability to manage people and their roles. It also provides people with the opportunity to describe their general expectations of an employee. It gives weight to the employer’s judgement as to what functions of a job are essential, especially if stated in a written description prepared for recruitment or selection.

  • A job description is a broad statement of the types of a worker’s responsibilities. In addition to helping organisations to find the employee they need, job descriptions are used for training, evaluation, promotion and accountability purposes.
  • It is important to think of the job description as the “recipe” for creating a potential candidate. If the “recipe” is flawed, the end result will be flawed.
  • For new jobs, the draft of the job description helps management to better understand the need for someone to fill a specific role.
  • Human resources department staff often use the job description to set the salary scales, unless these are determined through the government. Typically, Human resources department uses the information in the job description to assess the complexity of the job, compare this job with others in the organization and in the job market, to determine what an appropriate salary and benefits package should be.
  • Job descriptions are often posted on internal and on-line bulletin boards as a means of recruiting qualified candidates. Because job descriptions are usually longer than advertisements, they job description serve as very useful source material for formulating advertisements.


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